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Letter to African Youth

Letter to African Youth Dear African Youth I have never been more convinced now that, its up to the African Youth to change your Continent, Your home, and if you do not, our current governments will just ruin our beautiful Continent while we sit and watch. An analogy to this is, the a small child (Representing the African Youth) sitting in their home (Representing African Continent) as their parents(Representing the Current governments ) destroy the beautiful house knowing very well that this is what your parents will give you as your inheritance. So all we are doing is watching the house we live in go down in Flames. I say I will not just sit down and look at the Continent my future grand children will inherit go up in flames. Now its Africa for African youth, nothing else matters!!!! We must Unite under one Umbrella come up with an action plan and get to work as soon as you see this message, we are running out of time. Yours Faithfully Allan-Lloyd Junior Hamusok

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African School Education

African School Education Most Africans are told to go to school, get a degree or masters and get a job.  The Question is who do we expect to create the jobs we are going to school for? And why do We think they will have jobs waiting for us? What happens if they do not? What is our plan B?  We can no longer tell ourselves that after we get our degree we will simply get a job. It's time we start creating the Jobs!  ‪#‎ AfricanYouthMovement ‬ The past generation have done their part, its time we perform ours. I'm An African and Proud!  By Allan Lloyd Junior Hamusokwe

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The Greatest Legacy Colonization Left

The Greatest Legacy  Colonization  Left The greatest legacy  Colonization  has left was to make us Africans believe that we can only get rich through our natural resources. If that were true then places like the USA and JAPAN would not exist!  The only way we will get rich as a Continent is not only dependant upon how many different type of resources we have, it’s in how much we spend on each other. The amount of money we spend on ourselves should be more than we spend on other different races. ‪#‎ AfricanYouthMovement‬ The past generation have done their part, its time we perform ours. I'm An African and Proud!  By Allan Lloyd Junior Hamusokwe 

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Africa Is Bleeding: Illicit Financial Flows

Africa Is Bleeding: Illicit Financial Flows

A lot of people may not be aware of what Illicit Financial Flows are and the crippling effect they have on our nations. I will attempt to demystify the issue a little and provide an example of efforts being made to curb this bleeding. So, what are Illicit Financial Flows? “Illicit Financial Flows are illegal movements of money or capital from one country to another. Global Financial Integrity classifies this movement as an illicit financial flow when the funds are illegally earned, transferred and/or utilised.” How does this affect us in Africa? The Africa Union High Level Panel on Illicit Financial Flows and the UN Economic Commission for Africa presented a report to the 24th African Union Summit which was adopted by the African Heads of State and government. According to the High Level Panel Report, it is estimated that Africa loses between $30 billion to $60 billion in illicit financial flows each year and this is increasing at a disheartening rate of 20.2% per year, based

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Times Have Changed

Times Have Changed

Africa is the youngest continent that is being led by the oldest generals. I love reading about African traditions and stories in general. I believe that they carry so much weight to explain how we are today. I also think that it does not come from me though- my grandfather wrote a book on the traditions of our tribe. It was the first of its kind from the western region of Kenya published in the 60s. So for sure I know this curiosity runs in the family. The other day I was thinking about the Maasai. We may have heard or know of the tribe that to pass onto manhood- a boy as young as 13 years old would have to kill a lion in the past. That was a right of passage from childhood to adulthood.  Every tribe has a different ritual, but one thing remains similar- there is a passage. Traditionally, there is a step that a young person must take to enter adulthood. That he/ she is prepared for and then trusted with responsibility: A baton is passed. Over the decades, we are progressively movi

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The African Women "Role-Model Series"

The aim of this series is to inspire the next generation of African Women by highlighting individuals of high esteem. A selection of 12 outstanding women from across the continent have been showcased by our panel of Youth Activists!

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 INTERVIEW: Daniel Ozoukou on “Youth & Politics”

INTERVIEW: Daniel Ozoukou on “Youth & Politics”

Daniel Ozoukou Abidjan, Ivory Coast This week we had the opportunity to speak with Mr Daniel Ozoukou on his personal insight into the state of Young people and Politics in his country. Mr Ozoukou is a Political Analyst from the Ivory Coast, with a post-graduate degree in Political Science and a history of articles on governance, democracy and peace. He also serves as a Youth Activist under the banner of Ignite The Youth. Here is what he has to say… Q As a Political Analyst, what can you tell us about the current political situation in Ivory Coast? A First of all I would like to thank you for the invitation, I am very pleased to discuss the month topic "Youth and Politics" .  Let me underline that I am very impressed by the work done by the Youth led organization Ignite The Youth .  Mr Alassane Ouattara winner of the presidential election in Ivory Coast, has recently taken oath. During the electoral process the incumbent president neglected not only the security qu

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INTERVIEW: Patson Malisa "Empowering The Youth"

INTERVIEW: Patson Malisa "Empowering The Youth"

Patson Malisa Photo Credit (P.Dhlamini 2014 As part of our focus on Youth & the African Union, we interviewed Mr. Patson Malisa of South Africa. Patson is the newly elected President of the Organisation of African Youth (OAYouth)  and has spent several years lobbying for African Youth at High Level meetings and other such progressive platforms. He is a trailblazer in the aspect of developing Youth Policy and continues to be the chief advocate for Youth Empowerment in Africa! Here is what he has to say... Q Please introduce the Organisation of African Youth (OAY) – What is your organization about? A "The Organisation of African Youth is an umbrella movement for youth organisations in the Continent who are pursuing the transformation of our society in social, economic and political dynamics. We serve to motivate, unify and empower our youth for effective service in their communities, countries and inevitably Africa as a whole."

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 If You Want Chaos… Take the Back Seat

If You Want Chaos… Take the Back Seat

Nerima Martha Wako Kenya Talking about politics to young people is always interesting. You never really know how to start. Do you ask if they read the newspaper?  Or do you mention the most recent government scandal and hope that they chime in with an opinion?  At least there you can gauge that they may have an idea after all!  In all honesty, I normally get 3 common responses.  I hate politics - that is one territory I know very well not to venture in to.  Some even go as far as asking you to stop speaking about it all together. Then there is - I really have no interest for politics, and politics is boring. Young people! I really have to break it to you (I am lying, I secretly enjoy this reality check): you have to be interested in politics!  This is the thing; many people try to distance themselves from politics. Which I can't blame you for, because over the years that is how things have been. We get tired of the petty dramas our politicians play.  But we need to realize

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Public Opinion Poll: "Youth & The African Union"

Public Opinion Poll: "Youth & The African Union"

In September 2015, under the auspices of Ignite The Youth (An international society of youth activists in Africa), We conducted a survey on the relationship between Youth and the African Union. The online based Public Opinion poll received 832 respondents from 24 African States. So what do young Africans think about the African Union? How do they rate the institution's perceived performance? The results recorded in this report indicate that a large section of the African population believes the African Union is important for young people and that it is capable of addressing their issues. However, a similarly large majority express discontent at the AU’s efforts to “empower” and “engage” the Youth. Furthermore, the institution was perceived to have failed the African youth by 67% of our respondents, and received an overall public rating of 3.2 out of 10. To view the Full report on our Survey Click Here :   https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0UfSqSxlrBHLXRUS3QtbGFGYkk/view?usp=s

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Not Her Fault!

Not Her Fault!

Denyse Uwineza (Rwanda) Mutoni experienced early pregnancy when she was 17 years, at the beginning of 2014. This destroyed her life because she dropped out of school and is currently raising her child alone. Mutoni’s case is only one example of the many “adolescent pregnancy” cases in Rwanda. This shows that there is still a lot to do to teach adolescents how to prevent early pregnancy so as to reduce the number of such cases in Rwanda and Africa as a whole.  The contribution of parents, teachers and society as a whole are needed to teach adolescents on how to prevent early pregnancy. Role models play an important role in a teenager’s daily life but most of them do not deeply discuss sexuality with them. The lack of complete, clear and accessible information is a major factor that influences these young people to prematurely engage in sexual activities and possibly be impregnated. Moreover, other dynamics also contribute to the overlooking of contraceptive measures by adolescen

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Not Her Fault!

Not Her Fault!

Denyse Uwineza (Rwanda) Mutoni experienced early pregnancy when she was 17 years, at the beginning of 2014. This destroyed her life because she dropped out of school and is currently raising her child alone. Mutoni’s case is only one example of the many “adolescent pregnancy” cases in Rwanda. This shows that there is still a lot to do to teach adolescents how to prevent early pregnancy so as to reduce the number of such cases in Rwanda and Africa as a whole.  The contribution of parents, teachers and society as a whole are needed to teach adolescents on how to prevent early pregnancy. Role models play an important role in a teenager’s daily life but most of them do not deeply discuss sexuality with them. The lack of complete, clear and accessible information is a major factor that influences these young people to prematurely engage in sexual activities and possibly be impregnated. Moreover, other dynamics also contribute to the overlooking of contraceptive measures by adolescen

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INTERVIEW: Aya Chebbi on her Agenda for African Youth!

INTERVIEW: Aya Chebbi on her Agenda for African Youth!

Aya Chebbi As part of our focus on Youth & the African Union, we interviewed Ms. Aya Chebbi of Tunisia. Aya is the Founder of the African Youth Movement (AYM) and an internationally acclaimed Youth Activist. As a very vocal youth leader and public figure, here is what she has to say about her agenda for the African Youth... Q Please introduce the African Youth Movement (AYM) – What is your “Movement” about? A  "I have had this vision that, in our shared marginalization as young Africans, we could develop a sense of common identity and a critical consciousness that would enable us to challenge the status quo. That is how AYM was born. It is a movement to grow this common identity with strategic collective response to our own challenges. AYM is a movement of young African visionaries, organizers and advocates in Africa and around the world taking the agenda of African youth from the margins of society into the centers of national, regional and international discourse t

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INTERVIEW:  Timothy Mugerwa on African Youth

INTERVIEW: Timothy Mugerwa on African Youth

Mr. Timothy Mugerwa President, African Youth Union (AYU) Ignite The Youth is currently focused on Youth in the African Union. As part of this thematic undertaking we will be interviewing selected Youth Leaders and gathering their views and opinions on the organization and how it interacts with the African Youth. Our first interviewee is Mr. Timothy Mugerwa of Uganda. Timothy is the President of the African Youth Union (AYU) and has experience working with youth across the continent for up to 10 years. Here is what he has to say... Q.   Please introduce the African Youth Union (AYU) – What is your organization about? A.  The African Youth Union (AYU) is a Pan-African youth organization boasting the largest youth representation in Africa. It bridges the gap between the youth and government, and acts as a conduit between the youth and regional bodies. The AYU is mandated to lobby governments for the implementation of youth centered policies. These policies seek to promot

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#DidYouKnow? The African Youth Charter

#DidYouKnow? The African Youth Charter

In Article 28 of the African Youth Charter, the African Union Commission (AUC) states its duties and obligations to the Youth. Read the Article below: Article 28: Duties of the African Union Commission The African Union Commission shall ensure that States Parties respect the commitments made and fulfil the duties outlined in the present Charter by; A) Collaborating with governmental, non-governmental institutions and developmental partners to identify best practices on youth policy formulation and implementation and encouraging the adaptation of principles and experiences among States Parties; B) Inviting States Parties to include youth representatives as part of their delegations to the ordinary sessions of the African Union and other relevant meetings of the policy organs to broaden the channels of communication and enhance the discussion of youth-related issues; C) Instituting measures to create awareness of its activities and make information on its activi

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AFRICAN UNION: Did You Know?

AFRICAN UNION: Did You Know?

Nerima Martha Wako Nairobi, Kenya Youth and the African Union (AU) are words that are not regularly conjunct. For many of us, we only hear of the AU every year when we see in our television sets and newspapers that the different Heads of State in Africa are attending a meeting.  Due to the coverage, we put two and two together and recognize that “this must be important” . However, several youth cannot articulate to you what was discussed at the meeting; what were there resolutions made? And do they impact me?  Most youth are actually unaware that the AU has platforms for the youth.  The African Youth Charter was endorsed in July 2006 in Banjul, Gambia and I think of it as one of the most progressive legal documents that encompass youth.  Why would I say that?  Reading the document one can find the usual freedoms, which are Freedom of Speech, or Freedom of Association etc. However, there was one that stood out; The Freedom of Thought .  Some of the national constitutions in our

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Conflict in Botswana

Conflict in Botswana

Nozizwe W. Ntesang Botswana In Botswana, we are fortunate to have never experienced conflict in the sense that is synonymous with wars (as is the case in other African countries.) My analysis of this topic therefore will be at a micro-level. There are various kinds of conflict that I've encountered, the first one being a Gender conflict. This is perpetuated by the patriarchal nature of our culture as Batswana. Examples of such are the belief that a man is not to be questioned by his wife/held accountable for actions, the belief that a man is entitled to extra-marital affairs which he shan't be quizzed on either, "monna ke selepe o a adimanwa," amongst many others. This cultural stance causes a lot of conflict within Batswana homes because it gives men the upper hand in a marriage as opposed to the spouses being equals within their home. It also breeds an attitude of an impunity in men which is not a desirable trait in conflict resolution. In a country with

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The Trying Days of Timber

The Trying Days of Timber

Ms. Tony Joy Akure, Nigeria I Spying into the unforeseen future I hear the loud voices of the timber Crying its way out of all shivers But why Timber, shall you ponder in the gutter of shivers? Why have you lost your pride to shivers? Why timber? Questions keep knocking The past comes ringing Floods of untimely tears Oh, alas, yet again, understanding comes running All because of the shivers of Timber Shall Timber die or shall she lose her grip?

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YOUTH AND CONFLICT IN SOMALIA

YOUTH AND CONFLICT IN SOMALIA

Bisharo Ali Hussein Galkacyo,Somalia Many Somali youth have known nothing but conflict and hardship for most of their lives, especially in south central. Where can you search for hope when all you have ever known is conflict, poverty, loss and displacement? This is the profound question facing Somalia's lost generation. Somalia's young population could be its greatest strength, but only if it tackles the sky-high unemployment and economic disenfranchisement. More than half of Somalia's population is under 18, with the majority born after the overthrow of Mohammed Siad Barre in 1991, the pivotal event that sent the country spiraling into a deeper anarchy. Somali people are facing a post-conflict dilemma: prioritizing recovery when the peace objective prevails over the economic development objective. Yet at the heart of the nation building we must look to the future and ensure that youth unemployment is also on the agenda.

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We Are Stronger Than We Thought!

We Are Stronger Than We Thought!

(An open letter to All African Youth) Alvin John Stephen Arusha, Tanzania Dear African Youth, My Brothers and Sisters, I’ll try to make this as short as possible, knowing that most of my fellow youth hate to read.  I don’t want to believe that our banks of reasoning, tolerance, common sense and forgiveness have gone bankrupt. My fellow African, truth only means something when it's hard to admit and I suggest our bad memories are best forgotten. Personally I cannot ask anymore of a man than what I believe the man can deliver, but I’m asking every young African with common sense to summon the spirit of Royalty, to this continent! Africa is mother to us all and God blessed her with everything. What we need is a better future for her and we must fight for it!

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What Happens After?

What Happens After?

Nerima Martha Wako Nairobi, Kenya When speaking on youth and conflict we tend to focus on terrorist groups such as Boko Haram which started as a youth group and Al Shabaab where the majority of their members are youth. Then, thinking a bit more deeply on the matter, we also recognize the narrative that is often used by the peace building community. I call it a community because only specific people involved in these organizations would understand the types of terminologies that are often used and have only sprung up recently. The other day I contemplated on the different context that we give young people that are surrounded by violent conflict. When we are in South Sudan we call a 13 year old a "child soldier" , somewhere in the Middle East he may be referred to as a "terrorist" , while in the United States - "a gang member" .  When the narrative changes like this, can it affect how we perceive our youth after a conflict and how we treat them? Thes

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The African Youth & Conflict

The African Youth & Conflict

Buhari AY Balla Abuja, Nigeria The African youths are still suffering and facing the cronyism and egoism of bad leadership from our present and past leaders of our African continent. The youth unemployment, poverty, lack of good education and corruption have led many African youths and states into political, religious, tribal and regional conflict. Thus countless young people have died, whilst others have joined rebels and insurgents in some African countries in conflict.The main reasons why the youth are part of creating conflict themselves is due to the lack of accountability, stability and good governance in their countries.  African leaders should show respect to the people of their country because what's happening in many African states nowadays, like Nigeria with the issue of insurgents, has destroyed the image of the country. The national economy, education system and the overall social development of the country have been scattered by the insurgency most especially

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Somali Youth: The Prime Force for Peace

Somali Youth: The Prime Force for Peace

Mohamed W. Sandhol Mogadishu, Somalia Somali Youth are often the prime force that can bring conflict or peace, it is up to the adults and national leaders to ensure that they use this force in a positive direction.  In almost every conflict, especially wars, youths are on the front line because that is the only available option for them. Youth often have less information on how to be peaceful, they have less knowledge on the impacts of an unstable environment. This is because they do not have appropriate subjects taught to them in school to address peace-building. Many African nations have poor curriculum that does not contain any  teachings on social behaviors, professional communication and differences of human thinking. All of these are strategies which can promote the strength of youth in peace building and maximize on their potential as a preventive means of controlling conflict situations. 

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Educate Her

Educate Her

Nyasha Phanisa Sithole Zimbabwe Educate Her -You have given her a voice to shout!! "Give me a voice and I will speak for myself" is a true statement that can be said by an educated and empowered young African girl. Education is the key to girl child empowerment and should be recognised as a right on its own. Many young girls in Africa still have challenges in accessing education even at primary level and this has negative consequences on the development of individuals, communities and nations at large. Failure to ensure access to education for the girl child is failure to ensure social, economic and political development.  There are various forms of education that can be offered to the girl child in Africa and amongst them the most crucial is Comprehensive Sexuality Education. Comprehensive Sexuality education can be seen as “precautionary” education that has a direct influence to the total wellbeing of a girl child. Comprehensive Sexuality Education is defined as

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Re-defining Education In Africa

Re-defining Education In Africa

Dieudonne Kodjo Perry Liberia How can one be educated and not be creative? How can one possess a mind full of facts and lack a mind full of original ideas? How can one be capable of finding solutions to every quadratic problem but unable to find solution to real problems hampering the growth and development of the African continent?  These are questions that constantly resonate my mind as I look at our educational sector throughout Africa, mainly Liberia. Even though the education system has its pluses, a huge portion needs to be remodeled for the purpose the 21st century workforce. The current model used in our educational sector focuses more on knowledge that usually expires few months after its being acquired. It places more emphasis on regurgitation of facts and information easily found in books, encyclopedias, atlases, internet as opposed to skills students need to be successful in Life. This failed traditional model has injured and crippled more bright minds on the continen

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African Youth and Education

African Youth and Education

Nomfundo Dlamini Swaziland It’s almost the end 2015, which marks 15 years since Swaziland, the international community, civil society and the private sector set out to achieve concrete millennium development goals (MDGs). However, the achievements related to the MDGs and the 'Education For All' goal that was set, shows a mixed picture on the ground. Enrollment rates for primary school have increased but the quality of education has not improved. Poorly paid teachers and unqualified teachers, particularly at primary school, have also aggravated the situation of poor education quality. The progression of girls to higher levels of schooling has not been that impressive either. Further worsening the situation is that inasmuch as education is meant to be free at the primary level; there are some hidden costs that we tend to overlook which contributes to some children dropping out of school.  Poor families still have to buy uniforms, purchase some school supplies and contrib

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Youth & Education in Botswana

Youth & Education in Botswana

Nozizwe W. Ntesang Botswana Botswana, my country of birth and origin, is located in Southern-Africa right above South Africa. It is home to around two million people and is known mostly for diamond exports and breath-taking tourist attractions – both which help to immensely sustain our ever-growing economy.  The proceeds from the diamonds are generous enough to among other things; provide free basic education to all citizens from primary school to secondary school and even varsity. For this, the government should be applauded because it is not every African country that is able to impart such a privilege to its citizens. 

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Batswana Youth On "Education" - Letlhogonolo Moremi

Batswana Youth On "Education" - Letlhogonolo Moremi

Interview conducted by Ms. Nozizwe Ntesang, hearing the views of young Batswana on Education in their country (Botswana). Hi. I'm Letlhogonolo Godsave Christian Moremi. I'm a 21 year old LLB student at the University of Botswana. I'm a debater, blogger, also write and perform spoken word poetry under the pseudonym YanSen.

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Batswana Youth On "Education" - Mmathapelo Marumo

Batswana Youth On "Education" - Mmathapelo Marumo

Interview conducted by Ms. Nozizwe Ntesang, hearing the views of young Batswana on Education in their country (Botswana). My name is Mmathapelo Marumo. I am a young woman who just recently turned 19. I’m a media studies student at the University of Botswana, and I will be starting my second year this coming August. I’m also currently freelancing at the local newspaper, Sunday Standard.

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Batswana Youth On "Education" - Karabo Thobega

Batswana Youth On "Education" - Karabo Thobega

Interview conducted by Ms. Nozizwe Ntesang, hearing the views of young Batswana on Education in their country (Botswana). My name is Karabo Thobega. A young Motswana doing my Assosciate Degree in Graphic Design at Limkokwing University of Creative Technology. I am also an Entrepreneur, owner of a street-wear clothing brand called Symbols Apparel. Aimed at being self employed by running this business and also creating job opportunities for others.

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Batswana Youth On "Education" - Kago Boitumelo

Batswana Youth On "Education" - Kago Boitumelo

Interview conducted by Ms. Nozizwe Ntesang, hearing the views of young Batswana on Education in their country (Botswana). My name is Kago Boitumelo, I am a 21 year old Motswana. I am currently at University of Botswana studying BSc (Computing with Finance). I have attended 'private' schools from primary school through to secondary school.

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Liberate the African Youth With Purposeful Education

Liberate the African Youth With Purposeful Education

Temba Rwambiwa Zimbabwe The essence of education is to empower and elevate one towards attaining personal goals and contributing to the development of society. Much of human development can be attributed to various forms of education, however the type of education referred to in this article is the formal education of schools, colleges and universities.  Most African countries at independence adopted the education systems of their colonial masters, and through the years little or no changes were made to suit the African standards. In most cases education helped to further Colonise the African mind than liberate it. Our history lessons were filled with the stories of the Europeans. We grew up knowing more about Hitler, Napoleon, French revolutions than our own Sankaras, Lumumba, Biko and others. The system was not created to benefit us mostly but it served more as a form of mental slavery.

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Preparing Students for the Work Environment

Preparing Students for the Work Environment

Ajobiewe Tolulope Odigwe Nigeria Does the Nigerian education system prepare students for the work environment? The status quo of the nation’s educational system has been a major discourse which has consistently made headlines in the global news community over the past decades. This is evident by the multiplicity of essays penned by renowned essayists describing how ill and ailing the country’s educational system is, and how the education system has lost its intrinsic worth and virtues. It is no longer news that the standard of education available and obtainable in Nigeria has declined and is very much below the average expected by Nigerians. Nelson Mandela once thundered that, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world’’ . As such, the plea and demand for quality education in Nigeria is justified and has to be emphasized at all levels of government.

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 Somalia’s Young People Face a Different Struggle

Somalia’s Young People Face a Different Struggle

Mohamed W. Sandhol Mogadishu, Somalia Today, Somalia’s young people face a different struggle, which requires a similar movement; a struggle against the challenges of unemployment, poverty, inequality and no education. Somalia has an education system which does not have public schools. Our private schools are, as a result, overcrowded, under-resourced, understaffed and lack quality. Unemployment has plagued the youth of Somalia. Youth unemployment has become a particular obstacle in the fight against poverty and undermines efforts to impose peace & stability in the country. Because Youth Unemployment is currently at staggering levels, the majority of  those employed are in low paying jobs. Criminal groups like the Al-Shabaab terrorists are taking advantage of this pathetic situation of the youth by recruiting them as soldiers/fighters.

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Ensuring Access To Education For All In Somalia

Ensuring Access To Education For All In Somalia

Bisharo Ali Hussein Galkacyo, Somalia Basic Education for children and youth, especially girls, is an important commitment of the government and humanitarian agencies in Somalia, and a difficult one to fulfill. Humanitarian agencies, private organizations and the government have made a significant contribution through training teachers and providing limited material assistance to primary schools and to the Koranic schools which offer some elements of basic education-literacy, numeracy,  hygiene,  conflict resolution and peace building strategies to pupils. To extended access to education, particularly for girls, it is essential to help parents understand its importance and what specific benefits can be derived from it. There is a need for a drastic increase in the level of social mobilization and community education to help the population understand the need, particularly with respect to education of girls.

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Re-Aligning The Education System

Re-Aligning The Education System

Esanju Maseka Zambia How Can An Improvement in the Quality of Education Lead to Job Creation? “Learn to do a job rather than learn to get a job!” Wise words I wish had been shared with me much earlier on in my educational career. You see, the notion often preached to students is for them to get the highest possible qualification they can get so that when they apply for “that job” they will have a better chance of getting it than “that other applicant”. The end result? The country’s job market flooded with too many over qualified students competing for too few jobs. And, the reality that employees aren’t actually looking for qualification upon qualification, but actual experience. A term often referred to as education inflation. In fact, there is a growing trend across Africa showing a mismatch between the quality of the graduates being produced and the needs of the job market. 

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The Next Generation

The Next Generation

I was listening to a 'Voice of America' podcast that was speaking on education in South Africa and the changes that they want to implement in the curriculum.  Then in the introduction the man being interviewed was speaking about how he had visited a local primary school. He went to a classroom and asked the students, "How many of you want to be teachers?" and no one raised their hand, there was utter silence in the room. The truth of the matter is teachers are paid peanuts, especially teachers in Africa.  Public primary schools suffer with horrendous ratios of teachers and students: One teacher can be assigned to more than 60 students and there are some cases of up to 100 students per teacher in rural areas!  How can one have that one-on-one relationship with a student?  Then there are several schools in absurd conditions; some have not been maintained for decades and others are constituted as gatherings under a tree. The teacher is only a teacher because

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 'Educated But Not Learned'

'Educated But Not Learned'

Joan Mwende Kenya Education Systems Ought to Lead to Wholesome & Productive Employees The 8. 4. 4 system is Kenya’s Education system; which basically means going through eight years of primary school education, four years of secondary and four other years of university. Having gone through it and being on my second last year of the system, there is no doubt it has been of more good than harm. At my age, I can very well compete at the same level with my classmates in campuses from different parts of the Kenya, not to mention East Africa. My arithmetic skills, a few sporting skills and certificates of Music festivals and Drama festivals are a constant reminder of the benefit the system has been to me and my mates.

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