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Liberate the African Youth With Purposeful Education

Liberate the African Youth With Purposeful Education

Temba Rwambiwa Zimbabwe The essence of education is to empower and elevate one towards attaining personal goals and contributing to the development of society. Much of human development can be attributed to various forms of education, however the type of education referred to in this article is the formal education of schools, colleges and universities.  Most African countries at independence adopted the education systems of their colonial masters, and through the years little or no changes were made to suit the African standards. In most cases education helped to further Colonise the African mind than liberate it. Our history lessons were filled with the stories of the Europeans. We grew up knowing more about Hitler, Napoleon, French revolutions than our own Sankaras, Lumumba, Biko and others. The system was not created to benefit us mostly but it served more as a form of mental slavery.

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Preparing Students for the Work Environment

Preparing Students for the Work Environment

Ajobiewe Tolulope Odigwe Nigeria Does the Nigerian education system prepare students for the work environment? The status quo of the nation’s educational system has been a major discourse which has consistently made headlines in the global news community over the past decades. This is evident by the multiplicity of essays penned by renowned essayists describing how ill and ailing the country’s educational system is, and how the education system has lost its intrinsic worth and virtues. It is no longer news that the standard of education available and obtainable in Nigeria has declined and is very much below the average expected by Nigerians. Nelson Mandela once thundered that, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world’’ . As such, the plea and demand for quality education in Nigeria is justified and has to be emphasized at all levels of government.

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 Somalia’s Young People Face a Different Struggle

Somalia’s Young People Face a Different Struggle

Mohamed W. Sandhol Mogadishu, Somalia Today, Somalia’s young people face a different struggle, which requires a similar movement; a struggle against the challenges of unemployment, poverty, inequality and no education. Somalia has an education system which does not have public schools. Our private schools are, as a result, overcrowded, under-resourced, understaffed and lack quality. Unemployment has plagued the youth of Somalia. Youth unemployment has become a particular obstacle in the fight against poverty and undermines efforts to impose peace & stability in the country. Because Youth Unemployment is currently at staggering levels, the majority of  those employed are in low paying jobs. Criminal groups like the Al-Shabaab terrorists are taking advantage of this pathetic situation of the youth by recruiting them as soldiers/fighters.

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Ensuring Access To Education For All In Somalia

Ensuring Access To Education For All In Somalia

Bisharo Ali Hussein Galkacyo, Somalia Basic Education for children and youth, especially girls, is an important commitment of the government and humanitarian agencies in Somalia, and a difficult one to fulfill. Humanitarian agencies, private organizations and the government have made a significant contribution through training teachers and providing limited material assistance to primary schools and to the Koranic schools which offer some elements of basic education-literacy, numeracy,  hygiene,  conflict resolution and peace building strategies to pupils. To extended access to education, particularly for girls, it is essential to help parents understand its importance and what specific benefits can be derived from it. There is a need for a drastic increase in the level of social mobilization and community education to help the population understand the need, particularly with respect to education of girls.

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Re-Aligning The Education System

Re-Aligning The Education System

Esanju Maseka Zambia How Can An Improvement in the Quality of Education Lead to Job Creation? “Learn to do a job rather than learn to get a job!” Wise words I wish had been shared with me much earlier on in my educational career. You see, the notion often preached to students is for them to get the highest possible qualification they can get so that when they apply for “that job” they will have a better chance of getting it than “that other applicant”. The end result? The country’s job market flooded with too many over qualified students competing for too few jobs. And, the reality that employees aren’t actually looking for qualification upon qualification, but actual experience. A term often referred to as education inflation. In fact, there is a growing trend across Africa showing a mismatch between the quality of the graduates being produced and the needs of the job market. 

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The Next Generation

The Next Generation

I was listening to a 'Voice of America' podcast that was speaking on education in South Africa and the changes that they want to implement in the curriculum.  Then in the introduction the man being interviewed was speaking about how he had visited a local primary school. He went to a classroom and asked the students, "How many of you want to be teachers?" and no one raised their hand, there was utter silence in the room. The truth of the matter is teachers are paid peanuts, especially teachers in Africa.  Public primary schools suffer with horrendous ratios of teachers and students: One teacher can be assigned to more than 60 students and there are some cases of up to 100 students per teacher in rural areas!  How can one have that one-on-one relationship with a student?  Then there are several schools in absurd conditions; some have not been maintained for decades and others are constituted as gatherings under a tree. The teacher is only a teacher because

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 'Educated But Not Learned'

'Educated But Not Learned'

Joan Mwende Kenya Education Systems Ought to Lead to Wholesome & Productive Employees The 8. 4. 4 system is Kenya’s Education system; which basically means going through eight years of primary school education, four years of secondary and four other years of university. Having gone through it and being on my second last year of the system, there is no doubt it has been of more good than harm. At my age, I can very well compete at the same level with my classmates in campuses from different parts of the Kenya, not to mention East Africa. My arithmetic skills, a few sporting skills and certificates of Music festivals and Drama festivals are a constant reminder of the benefit the system has been to me and my mates.

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Africa Lacks Policies that Engage and Empower Its Youth

Africa Lacks Policies that Engage and Empower Its Youth

 Jarius Andrew Greaves (Corresponding Activist) Paynesville, LIBERIA Africa Lacks Policies that Engage and Empower Its Youth: Youth Constitutes 60% of the Total Population Africa’s greatest challenge is that it lacks policies that engage and empower its youth, who constitutes 60% of Africa’s total population. The youth are invaluable assets which the continent can harness for future political stability, economic growth, and workforce supply. Yet, Africa’s political leaders have not (or have inadequately) developed social, educational, and health policies and programs that address the youth’s needs, include them in political processes, and provide sustainable training programs.  For example: in Liberia, programs to engage youth for sustainable progress, address their plights and ensure a brighter future for them are weak or don't exist. To illustrate this further, the President of Liberia declared in 2013 that the education system in Liberia was broken. She also added tha

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AMIE SHERRIFF SANGARIE: The Gem of Sierra Leone

AMIE SHERRIFF SANGARIE: The Gem of Sierra Leone

Mrs. Amie Sherrif Sangarie An ideal Role-model is one who embodies the characteristics of honesty, dedication, inspiration, education  and motivation, one whose life is worthy of emulation and admiration! By this brief I introduce to you our 21st century role model from Sierra Leone: Mrs Amie Sherriff Sangarie, a personality that marks the difference with an unassuming disposition. Thrilling in her 30's! Amie was Born in Freetown, Sierra Leone’s burgeoning capital but had a deep rooted childhood in Kenema Eastern Sierra Leone where  she grew up as a promising young girl, little wonder did she become that assumed dream. Growing up in an extended Family, Amie recalls how  she was motivated by the likes of  her Mother and the multitudes of illiterate woman who continue to toil daily with the expectations of life despite grand obstacles. She believes that the resilience of these women ignited her dreams of working towards human dignity.

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The Scarcity of Role Models

The Scarcity of Role Models

Sulaiman B. Sowa Makeni, Sierra Leone W hen I was growing up in the second capital city of Bo, there was always time to finger point people with marked personalities, they were virtually in abundance and the luxury of seeing them leading sanctified lives was worthy of admiration. These were days when we all got inspired by the things money can’t buy and our value for material things was low on the priority scale. I still consider myself lucky to have witnessed of period of abundance and scarcity on the marginal scale of role models. Then religion singularly injected the values of morality in every facet of society, homes were incomplete without religious doctrines, schools thought of religious and moral education, religious leaders were looked upon as divined intermediaries and were respected beyond their robes and regalia. Marital vows and problems were taken and settled in religious houses respectively, society saw infidelity as a crime equaling banishment, prayer was the cent

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ITY CONVERSATIONS: "The Youth & Education"

ITY CONVERSATIONS: "The Youth & Education"

The theme of our conversations for the month of JULY will be "Education". We will be discussing the 'Quality' of education, its 'Affordability' and how it is linked to the global 'Youth Unemployment' crisis. More importantly we will looking into the Education Systems in Africa - Are they tailored for the African Youth? What do young Africans think about Education? You can follow our conversation on Twitter, where we will be engaging the topic on a daily basis via @ITYAfrica for the entire duration of July 2015. 

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